Appreciating the Intricately Extraordinary

Thanks to Nephele Tempest for posting a link, I just saw a blog that shows a woman who took an incredible amount of time to express her thanks for the local Libraries in her home of Scotland. She is known as the Library Phantom for her anonymity in presenting different locations with her innovative sculptures. This definitely deserves a look.

It’s simply amazing the creativity that may ensue from an individual, especially given her passion for reading and vivid imagination. It’s simply amazing how the human mind behaves and functions, and how the deep affections of some cause even the smallest detail of a thing to be noticed and valued. What is particularly telling of these sculptures is how they relate to her appreciations of the existent libraries.

Upon looking at them, I was reminded of the influence my grandmother had on me growing up, in regard to fine arts and the imagination. Everything at her home drew upon some artsy inspiration or cultural influence. One could step into her living room with a cup of freshly brewed British tea, grab one of her array of books on the shelf, listen to Chopin on her radio (always set to the Classical station), and soon enough be whisked away through the imagination. When I was young, she saw great potential in me, and even bought me a classic typewriter when I was just under ten years old.

I think one of the characteristics that separates people who grow and those who don’t is how they pay attention–even to the tiniest of details. How we appreciate the intricate indicates how we discover its extraordinary nature. Some of the most fascinating photography displays are the ones that magnify the zoom so intently, even the eyes of the most minute insect are revealed and marveled.

In his book Pale Blue Dot, Carl Sagan argues that our earth is so utterly insignificant that no possibility exists for a Creator who might value humanity on this planet. Out of the entire universe, what arrogance on humanity’s part to even hold the idea that a higher deity would even care about them. However, Sagan’s view of God, though he didn’t care even for the idea of a Creator to exist, was itself very small. That an eternal being would appreciate and value, even what we might hold to be insignificant and tiny, must imply that God holds each person as valuable–to Him, we are His extraordinary.

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10 responses to “Appreciating the Intricately Extraordinary

  1. I listened to the band Tool for a while, particularly the album Lateralus which opened my eyes to appreciate the little things that actually are extremely big and complex, but the Christlessness of the band I do not appreciate at all, it has a real Buddhist feel to it. Check out the song Lateralus and you get a feel for what I’m talking about. As I kept studying Christianity I can’t help but to attribute to our all powerful Creator God that He is more complex, transcending of time and space, etc, than we will ever know… Therefore that’s why we marvel over such complexity; it is God’s power and knowledge and will that made it. Very cool.

    • Right after reading your comment, I went straight to listening to the song. Tool has always had excellent lyrics, although angrily depressing. They fit right into that time period of grunge in the 90s where everyone’s angry at the world. I literally grew up listening to KROQ (106.7 in Los Angeles), and it often conveyed the internal anger and sadness I had more than the Christian music I would try to listen to. However, this particular song, “Lateralus”, I agree does have a distinct Eastern influence on Tool’s expression of the human spirit/psyche. This song sounds like his angst for that deep spiritual connection–the very reason why so many people flock to an Eastern philosophy and/or spirituality after rejecting the Gospel as ‘religion’ and the dry mouth atheism leaves a person with.

      Thanks for the comment, and God bless!

  2. I found an off the wall quote from Einstein last light which I think is just a general statement about Buddhism. A little off subject of what we are talking about but it touches on it.

    http://chrisfincher.wordpress.com/2011/12/04/einstein-and-religion/

    Sad to say one of the biggest reasons I listened to Tool was the music they made was awesome imo… Thats one thing I kind of despise about Christian music today, even though I know all the focus should be on Christ, it’s like making actual detailed awe inspiring music in Christian music is almost labled as voodoo… I know music is very powerful and just be rightly used, but noone says that about classical music… Detailed awe inspiring music… and alot of composers were Christians.. Sorry for ranting, it just crossed my mind.

    • I completely agree with you actually! People are extraordinarily narrow-minded in what they think ought to be “Christian” music, that they forget the very faculty for music is a profound characteristic granted to mankind.

      I actually read your post. Good stuff!

  3. Everything at her home drew upon some artsy inspiration or cultural influence. One could step into her living room with a cup of freshly brewed British tea, grab one of her array of books on the shelf, listen to Chopin on her radio (always set to the Classical station), and soon enough be whisked away through the imagination

    and

    I think one of the characteristics that separates people who grow and those who don’t is how they pay attention–even to the tiniest of details. How we appreciate the intricate indicates how we discover its extraordinary nature.

    Awesome observation of your grandmother’s and a gem of truth!!! Thank you for sharing!

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